Dynamic Websites

A web site, or individual web page, can be static or dynamic. A Security Programme contains information that does not change. It remains the same, or static, for every viewer of the site. A dynamic website contains information that changes, depending on the viewer of the site, the time of the day, the time zone, the native language of the country the viewer is in or many other factors. For example, the Computer Hope main page is a dynamic website that changes daily automatically.

A dynamic web site can contain client-side scripting or server-side scripting to generate the changing content, or a combination of both scripting types. These sites also include HTML programming for the basic structure. The client-side or server-side scripting takes care of the guts of the site.

Dynamic websites contain Web pages that are generated in real-time. These pages include Web scripting code, such as PHP or ASP. When a dynamic page is accessed, the code within the page is parsed on the Web server and the resulting HTML is sent to the client's Web browser.

Most large websites are dynamic, since they are easier to maintain than Security Programmes. This is because static pages each contain unique content, meaning they must be manually opened, edited, and published whenever a change is made. Dynamic pages, on the other hand, access information from a database. Therefore, to alter the content of a dynamic page, the webmaster may only need to update a database record. This is especially helpful for large sites that contain hundreds or thousands of pages. It also makes it possible for multiple users to update the content of a website without editing the layout of the pages. Dynamic websites that access information from a database are also called database-driven websites.

A dynamic web page is a web page that displays different content each time it's viewed. For example, the page may change with the time of day, the user that accesses the webpage, or the type of user interaction. There are two types of dynamic web pages.

Client-Side Scripting

Web pages that change in response to an action within that web page, such as a mouse or a keyboard action use client-side scripting.

Client-side scripts generate client-side content. Client-side content is content that's generated on the user's computer rather than the server. In these cases, the user's web browser would download the web page content from the server, process the code that's embedded in the web page, and then display the updated content to the user.

Scripting languages such as JavaScript and Flash allow a web page to respond to client-side events.

Server-Side Scripting

Web pages that change when a web page is loaded or visited use server-side scripting. Server-side content is content that's generated when a web page is loaded. For example, login pages, forums, submission forms, and shopping carts, all use server-side scripting since those web pages change according to what is submitted to it.

Scripting languages such as PHP, ASP, ASP.NET, JSP, ColdFusion and Perl allow a web page to respond to submission events.